Cattle

Cattle

Cattle

TREATING CALF SCOURS

Calf scours is the most common symptom of illness in young calves and is usually a problem in the first month of life. The scour can be white, yellow, grey or blood-stained, and is often foul smelling. Scours can be caused by many organisms and more than one causative agent can be present in one animal. Viruses such as rotavirus, protozoa, bacteria such as salmonella and E-coli can cause problems, as well as internal parasites. Whatever the cause of the scour, the lining of the bowel is damaged, resulting in the loss of large amounts of body fluid into the gut. As a result, the calf quickly dehydrates, electrolytes become unbalanced, energy reserves are depleted and the calf may develop shock and die.

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Role of Vitamin A

Do your animals suffer from PINKEYE?, or Calf Scours?

Are you Grain Feeding?

VITIMIN A Supplimentation WILL ASSIST WITH THESE AND MANY OTHER PROBLEMS

 

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Vitamin B12 and improved production in Ruminants

 Facts about Vitamin B12 and Ruminants

¨Vitamin B12 is required for efficient energy metabolism

Efficient energy metabolism = higher weight gain

¨Vitamin B12 is made by the “bugs” in the rumen – ruminants have no other way of making this vitamin.

¨Management factors which upset the rumen balance (for example – a change of diet from pasture to crop, or stress such as weaning), reduce or prevent Vitamin B12 manufacture.

¨Stress increases the animals’ requirement for Vitamin B12 and reduces the supply-just when they need more they cannot make more! Also Vitamin B12 helps the nervous system cope with stress.

¨Cobalt is required to make Vitamin B12 so deficiencies are more likely when Cobalt is deficient or unavailable because of interactions with other trace elements.

 

Read more: Vitamin B12 and improved production in Ruminants

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Equine Health Videos

 

Please see the most recent health videos bellow.

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